Everyone has one-hundred sixty-eight hours in a week—how come some people find the time for family, some people find the time to attend workshops, and some people find the time to run more than one business yet others work excessive hours, don’t get out and seem to just live with results that never change?

In “Minding My Own Business,” author Dirk Dieters examines the six responsibilities of a small business owner. The business climate is difficult and there is only one guarantee—that the rate of change will accelerate. You have a responsibility to keep your company ahead of that curve. Are you investing the time required in this responsibility? The Fremont Group focuses you by teaching you that there is only one reason for your business to exist—to make your life better. When was the last time you made the effort to look at your business? How is your business making your life better? How is your business making your life worse? As a business owner decisions are actually very simple—we build upon the things that are making your life better and rid ourselves of the things that are making your life worse. Like other authors and experts, Dieters does not list as one of those responsibilities the requirement that the owner invest all of their efforts and time in the performance of the technical tasks in the business. Your responsibility as an owner is not to do other people’s jobs but rather to lead the company.

There are resources that make you company better. They range in cost from the nominal fee for a “Minding My Own Business”™ workshops to more intensive mentoring/coaching relationships yet we still hear the objection, “I don’t have the time” or “I don’t have the money.”

Everyone has one-hundred percent of their money—how come some people find the money to sharpen their skills and create change in their business how come some people live with results that never change?

Irrational decisions are most often the product of either fear or denial. Fear causes poor decisions; poor decisions lead to poor results. We can be afraid of many things—we can be afraid of being wrong. What if the workshop does not provide me with anything that builds upon the positives or rids us of a negative? We can be afraid of repeating a previous mistake. What will people (employees, family, etc.) think if it turns out to be another expensive venture that doesn’t really help? We can be afraid of being weak and at risk of being “talked into things.” People are already questioning my decision-making—what if this is a mistake? And we can be afraid of showing weakness. I am not going to admit that I might benefit from outside help. Companies go where the owner leads it. If it is led by fear it probably will never go where you want it to.

Some may classify denial as a form of fear, however I think that it deserves a classification of its’ own. It is a natural human trait to postpone difficult actions as long as possible. We hope that if we ignore a problem that it will go away. This is the equivalent of being hooked on drugs—we call it “hopium.” Unfortunately it sometimes works—and this just hooks us more. Hopium can paralyze. Just “hoping” that things will change can create a death spiral in a business. Rarely is the confrontation as painful as the problem itself. Things happen when we make them happen. Change takes place when issues are addressed, confronted and solved in a systematic method. If we wait and “hope” for change, we are allowing hopium to control our fate. Denial doesn’t solve problems and your employees know it. They expect to receive training and respect the fact that you seek continuous training in your job of leadership.

We all have the time—it is an allocation issue. Allocation of time and money. Would attendance at the workshop help you build upon the things that are making your life better? Would getting help improve the performance of your business? Would either help you rid yourself of things that are making your life worse? If any of the answers is yes then choosing to do nothing is not a rational decision. Allocating time to anything other less important things is not going to move either your business or your life forward. So why make an irrational decision? What else are you really going to do that could change your business and your life? Oh, I forgot—you don’t have the time/money.