Everyone has one-hundred sixty-eight hours in a week—how come some people find the time for family, some people find the time to attend workshops, and some people find the time to run more than one business yet others work excessive hours, don’t get out and seem to just live with results that never change?

In “Minding My Own Business,” author Dirk Dieters examines with the attendee the six responsibilities of a small business owner and applies those principles to the attendee’s business. Like other authors and experts, Dieters does not list as one of those responsibilities the requirement that the owner invest all of their efforts and time in the performance of the technical tasks in the business. Your responsibility as an owner is not to do other people’s jobs but rather to lead the company. The business climate is difficult and there is only one guarantee—that the rate of change will accelerate. You have a responsibility to keep your company ahead of that curve. Are you investing the time required in this responsibility? The Fremont Group focuses you by teaching you that there is only one reason for your business to exist—to make your life better. When was the last time you made the effort to look at your business? How is your business making your life better? How is your business making your life worse? As a business owner decisions are actually very simple—we build upon the things that are making your life better and rid ourselves of the things that are making your life worse. To make you a better business owner, The Fremont Group presents the acclaimed “Minding My Own Business”™ workshops. These are customized sessions for business owners only. Attendees universally agree that they leave with not only a better understanding of their business but also with specific actions that will make an immediate difference in their company. Yet the Fremont Group salespersons often hear the objection, “I don’t have the time.”

Irrational decisions are most often the product of either fear or denial. Fear causes poor decisions; poor decisions lead to poor results. We can be afraid of many things—we can be afraid of being wrong. What if the workshop does not provide me with anything that builds upon the positives or rids us of a negative? We can be afraid of repeating a previous mistake. What will people (employees, family, etc.) think if it turns out to be another expensive venture that doesn’t really help? We can be afraid of being weak and at risk of being “talked into things.” People are already questioning my decision-making—what if this is a mistake? And we can be afraid of showing weakness. I am not going to admit that I might benefit from outside help. Companies go where the owner leads it. If it is led by fear it probably will never go where you want it to.

Some may classify denial as a form of fear, however I think that it deserves a classification of its’ own. It is a natural human trait to postpone difficult actions as long as possible. We hope that if we ignore a problem that it will go away. This is the equivalent of being hooked on drugs—we call it “hopium.” Unfortunately it sometimes works—and this just hooks us more. Hopium can paralyze. Just “hoping” that things will change can create a death spiral in a business. Rarely is the confrontation as painful as the problem itself. Things happen when we make them happen. Change takes place when issues are addressed, confronted and solved in a systematic method. If we wait and “hope” for change, we are allowing hopium to control our fate. Denial doesn’t solve problems and your employees know it. They expect to receive training and respect the fact that you seek continuous training in your job of leadership.

We all have the time—it is an allocation issue. Would attendance at the workshop help you build upon the things that are making your life better? Would it help you rid yourself of things that are making your life worse? If the answer is yes to either then choosing not to attend is not a rational decision. Allocating time to anything other than these two objectives is not going to move either your business or your life forward. So why make an irrational decision? In less than three hours you can do something that can make a difference—what else are you really going to do that could change your business and your life? Oh, I forgot—you don’t have the time.

Dirk Dieters is the owner of The Fremont Group, a small-business management coaching firm in Aurora, Colorado. Mr. Dieters has an undergraduate degree in Business Education from Michigan State University and his law degree from Detroit College of Law. He has worked in management consulting since 1995.clip_image002 The Mission Statement of The Fremont Group clearly states his objectives: “The job of The Fremont Group is to make the lives of our clients better through a knowledgeable, trustworthy, truthful, empathetic, forward-looking and focused relationship.”

Mr. Dieters played baseball at Michigan State; coached baseball at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan; has owned his own small businesses; and at various times has held real estate and series seven licenses. He is married with five children and is the author of the book “Minding My Own Business” published in 2005. He also hosts “Minding My Own Business” Workshops designed for small-business owners nation-wide. He has published articles for the Institute of Management Consultants. Visit their web site at www.the-fremont-group.com.

© The Fremont Group 2007